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Nadaka, Contemporary Indian and World Music

     
Nadaka, My Story

NEWS TODAY

April 10, 2002

Nadaka - adding the right mix

Nadaka, after having enthralled lovers of Indian classical music by working alongside many renowned Indian musicians like A R Rahman, Vikku Vinayakram, Ganesh and Kumaresh, has yet again come out with three albums, 'The Lotus Trilogy' a three set of meditation music.
Nadaka, who was in Chennai last week for the preparation of the launch of his new album unwounded the successful musical pilgrimage he head undertaken. For him, The Lotus Trilogy is an 'interpretation of Indian music which has neither too much Carnatic nor Hindustani influences'.

The new album is based on acoustics and should be listened to in 'a silent and peaceful atmosphere without any disturbance as it contains a lot of subtleties' and Nadaka hopes that it will be a relief to people who suffer from the fast - paced life of today.

The preparation for the album, which took him almost two years to complete, started much before as the idea was actually proposed by an European record company and immediately took it up as a challenge', Nadaka states. 'It is just not music but a whole concept like philosophy', he adds.

The Trilogy contains a lot of sounds of nature that he himself had recorded from various places in rural India 'away from hustle and bustle of urban life'. Becoming eloquent on the latest attempt, Nadaka said the first and third parts contain a lot of Indian elements while traditional Tibetan elements are included in the second. Though Indian elements are there, he explains that he follows his own.

Besides, good research has gone into it to get the right Sanskrit pronunciation of the words in mantras that are featured in the cassettes.

With this guitar, he skillfully blends the techniques of ragas with chords and harmonies more akin to Western music. 'I felt attached to Indian philosophy and took on playing Indian music' and he made it his speciality to work with Indian musicians,' he notes.

Can we call it fusion music? Nadaka disagrees as, according to him, fusion was much more related to Jazz music only and he likes to consider his music as Indian and World Music.